Children’s Palace

Minnie Mouse In North Korea

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Minnie Mouse at the Mangyongdae Children’s Palace.

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Super Cute Kindergarten Performance

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Chongjin City kindergarten performance – photo by Joseph A Ferris III


Mangyongdae Children’s Palace Piano Lesson

Think you have what it takes to teach the best and brightest children of the Pyongyang elite?

Below one of my tour group members gives a demonstration to piano students at the Mangyongdae Children’s Palace.

Mangyongdae Children's Palace North Korea

Mangyongdae Children's Palace North Korea

Photos by Joseph A Ferris III


More photos from the Mangyongdae Children’s Palace

Gymnasts, dancers, and little stars perform at the Mangyongdae Children’s Palace:

Mangyongdae Children's Palace North Korea

Mangyongdae Children's Palace North Korea

Mangyongdae Children's Palace North Korea

Mangyongdae Children's Palace North Korea

The Mangyongdae Children’s Palace; a place for children of the privileged elite to spend time after school practicing sports, art, folk dance and music – and of course, show it all off with military like precision and forced smiles to groups of visiting foreign friends and tourists. More from this series linked below – all photos by Joseph A Ferris III

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Mangyongdae Children’s Palace

The Mangyongdae Children’s Palace; a place for children of the privileged elite to spend time after school practicing sports, art, folk dance and music – and of course, show it all off with military like precision and forced smiles to groups of visiting foreign friends and tourists.

Mangyongdae Children's Palace

Young Pioneers sing a martial song during a special Kim Il-sung’s 100th birthday celebratory performance at the Mangyongdae Children’s Palace. More pictures from this set linked below.

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North Korean Children’s Nearly Unbelievable Performances

I am here to apologize for my lack attention to this blog as of late.  I have been super busy with my duties as Chief Mate during short oceanographic research expeditions, hectic in port ship maintenance periods, and now working a crazy cruise on a full ship with over 50 scientists and crew – with that many people aboard available satellite internet bandwidth is in low supply making even the most general web surfing an agonizing chore.

I have also been busy planning a fall trip to Iran, Armenia, and Lebanon, along with two and a half weeks in Tuscany, Sicily, and Malta with my family.

Since I have been too busy to get any serious writing done (relatively recent picture posts don’t count), please let me at least pass along a DPRK post by my friend Joshua Spodek:  North Korean Children’s Nearly Unbelievable Performances – insights on children’s performances at the Mangyongdae Children’s Palace.

Mangyongdae Children's Palace North Korea

A young lady dances at the Mangyongdae Children’s Palace – this photo got me an honorable mention by the moderator of the Lonely Planet Flickr Photo Challenge.


North Korean Space Program

Mangyongdae Children's Palace North Korea

The North Korean space program?  No, just a mockup of a Soviet Russian Buran spacecraft at the Mangyongdae Children’s Palace, Pyongyang, North Korea – photo by Joseph A Ferris III


Tour of Athletics and Student Leisure Activities at the Mangyongdae Children’s Palace

Last year we were late getting to the Pyongyang Children’s Palace – we got to see most of the show but missed the tour of the classrooms.  For this year’s visit to the larger Mangyongdae Children’s Palace I made it a point to arrive extra early so we could get the full tour – on a day when a major performance was scheduled for western tourists and foreign dignitaries we were the first group to arrive.

Below is just a portion of what we were shown on our tour.  Child protegees train hard to perfect their skills in gymnastics and dance, while others students relax with games of volleyball and the traditional board game go.   How much of this was staged for us and how much was typical of what goes on, visiting tourists invading their classrooms or not, I cant really say.

Mangyongdae Children's Palace North Korea

Mangyongdae Children's Palace North Korea

Mangyongdae Children's Palace North Korea

Mangyongdae Children's Palace North Korea

Mangyongdae Children's Palace North Korea

Mangyongdae Children's Palace North Korea

Mangyongdae Children's Palace North Korea

Mangyongdae Children's Palace North Korea

Mangyongdae Children's Palace North Korea

Mangyongdae Children's Palace North Korea

Mangyongdae Children's Palace North Korea

Mangyongdae Children's Palace North Korea

Mangyongdae Children's Palace North Korea


Classroom Tour at the Mangyongdae Children’s Palace

Last year we were late getting to the Pyongyang Children’s Palace – we got to see most of the show but missed the tour of the classrooms.  For this year’s visit to the larger Mangyongdae Children’s Palace I made it a point to arrive extra early so we could get the full tour – on a day when a major performance was scheduled for western tourists and foreign dignitaries we were the first group to arrive.

Below is just a portion of what we were shown on our tour.  Child protegees and students work hard to perfect their studies in folk music, propaganda oration, drawing, and piano.  How much of this was staged for us and how much was typical of what goes on, visiting tourists invading their classrooms or not, I cant really say.

Mangyongdae Children's Palace North Korea

Mangyongdae Children's Palace North Korea

Mangyongdae Children's Palace North Korea

Mangyongdae Children's Palace North Korea

Mangyongdae Children's Palace North Korea

Mangyongdae Children's Palace North Korea

Mangyongdae Children's Palace North Korea

Mangyongdae Children's Palace North Korea

Mangyongdae Children's Palace North Korea

Mangyongdae Children's Palace North Korea

Mangyongdae Children's Palace North Korea

Piano Instruction North Korea

Piano Instruction North Korea

Mangyongdae Children's Palace North Korea

Our student guide for the classroom portion of the Mangyongdae Children’s Palace.


The Mangyongdae Children’s Palace

The Mangyongdae Children’s Palace, a place for the children of the privileged elite to spend time after school practicing sports, art, folk dance and music – and of course, show it all off with military like precision and forced smiles to groups of visiting foreign friends and tourists.

The Mangyongdae Children’s Palace is the largest of the many palaces in North Korea dedicated to Children’s after school activities. The Mangyongdae Children’s Palace has 120 rooms, a swimming pool, a gymnasium, and a 2000 seats theater. The Mangyongdae Children’s Palace is not to be confused with the Pyongyang Children’s Palace situated in the north of the Kim Il Sung Square and founded in 1963 – where I visited and saw a children’s performance last year.

Mangyongdae Children's Palace North Korea

A young girl opens a show for tourists and dignitaries at the Mangyongdae Children’s Palace.  This was a special performance to commemorate the Day of the Sun, the 100th birthday of ‘eternal president’ Kim Il-sung.  Many more pics from this performance to come!


More Photos from the Pyongyang Children’s Palace, North Korea

Photo series of performances from the Pyongyang Children’s Palace, DPRK, North Korea.

Children's Palace Pyongyang, North Korea

Children's Palace Pyongyang, North Korea

Children's Palace Pyongyang, North Korea

Children's Palace Pyongyang, North Korea

Children's Palace Pyongyang, North Korea

Children's Palace Pyongyang, North Korea

Children's Palace Pyongyang, North Korea

Children's Palace Pyongyang, North Korea

Children's Palace Pyongyang, North Korea

Children's Palace Pyongyang, North Korea

Children's Palace Pyongyang, North Korea

Children's Palace Pyongyang, North Korea

Children's Palace Pyongyang, North Korea

Children's Palace Pyongyang, North Korea

Children's Palace Pyongyang, North Korea

Children's Palace Pyongyang, North Korea

Children's Palace Pyongyang, North Korea


Pyongyang Children’s Palace, North Korea

The Pyongyang Children’s Palace, a place for the children of the privileged elite to spend time after school practicing sports, art, folk dance and music – and of course, show it all off with military like precision and forced smiles to groups of visiting foreign friends and tourists.

Children's Palace Pyongyang, North Korea

A young girl performs a North Korean folk dance at the Pyongyang Children’s Palace.